(Source: the-healing-nest)

I Do Not Support Autism Speaks (with image, tweets) · 4lala
“I chased my mom with an axe.”
Ommmggggg A Bomb Threat!!! #LOL

Sorry. Had to.

(Source: kinghanalister)

10 Poverty Myths, Busted | Mother Jones

gailsimone:

america-wakiewakie:

1. Single moms are the problem. Only 9 percent of low-income, urban moms have been single throughout their child’s first five years. Thirty-five percent were married to, or in a relationship with, the child’s father for that entire time.

2. Absent dads are the problem. Sixty percent of low-income dads see at least one of their children daily. Another 16 percent see their children weekly.

3. Black dads are the problem. Among men who don’t live with their children, black fathers are more likely than white or Hispanic dads to have a daily presence in their kids’ lives.

4. Poor people are lazy. In 2004, there was at least one adult with a job in 60 percent of families on food stamps that had both kids and a nondisabled, working-age adult.

5. If you’re not officially poor, you’re doing okay. The federal poverty line for a family of two parents and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Basic needs cost at least twice that in 615 of America’s cities and regions.

6. Go to college, get out of poverty. In 2012, about 1.1 million people who made less than $25,000 a year, worked full time, and were heads of household had a bachelor’s degree.

7. We’re winning the war on poverty. The number of households with children living on less than $2 a day per person has grown 160 percent since 1996, to 1.65 million families in 2011.

8. The days of old ladies eating cat food are over. The share of elderly single women living in extreme poverty jumped 31 percent from 2011 to 2012.

9. The homeless are drunk street people. One in 45 kids in the United States experiences homelessness each year. In New York City alone, 22,000 children are homeless.

10. Handouts are bankrupting us. In 2012, total welfare funding was 0.47 percent of the federal budget.

Reblog a thousand times.

I have been poor. I have lived in serious poverty. 

I worked as hard then as I do now, and I work very hard indeed, as did almost everyone else I knew who was poor, regardless of background, ethnicity, or marriage status. 

We all know these things the wealthy and entitled say are lies…why do we allow that to continue to be the narrative?

An Open Letter to Jenny McCarthy

themarysue:

When you’re having one of those days. 

(Source: x-cetera)

Watched this episode again last week. :)

(Source: tomhazeldine)

kateordie:

boompen:

LUMBERJANES #2 FOC’s today! Tell all your friends and comic shops all about it!

Cover A is from Noelle Stevenson (MAR140982) and COVER B is from Tessa Stone (MAR140983)!

YES

themarvjthompson:

Black Superheroes in Comic Book Movies.

I wanted to make this to show my appreciation to black superheroes. As you can see, it’s not a lot of them in Hollywood films. But, unlike DC, I can respect Marvel for featuring several black superheroes in their comic book movies. And we are still waiting on Black Panther, Green Lantern (John Stewart), Static and many more. 

 (click the images to view the character names) 

In which the Titans go see Frozen and utterly regret it;

(Source: eknowbaria)

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.